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When the independent federal watch-dog agency, the Government Accountability Office (GAO), released its 2017 “High Risk List” of dysfunctional, inefficient and wasteful programs, the 2020 Decennial Census made the Top 3 – out of a total of 34.Continue Reading.
Cameron Credle was barely more than a toddler when he was diagnosed with abnormally high cholesterol. And over the years, despite being an avid runner and bicyclist and a careful eater, Credle has seen his numbers climb high into the 400s. Even the cholesterol medications he was taking didn’t get him into the healthy range of under 200. Continue reading.
Adrian Thomas falsely confessed to harming his infant son when Troy police told him that admittance could save the boy's life. Video footage of the nearly 10-hour interrogation revealed what they didn't tell him: the boy was already dead. Continue reading.
Any day now, President Donald Trump is expected to sign legislation that will undo an Obama-era regulation about drug testing the jobless. Ever since unemployment insurance was created by the Social Security Act of 1935, states were forbidden from drug testing applicants. Continue reading.
Even if white and black men are the same heights and weights, people tend to perceive black men as taller, more muscular and heavier. So said a psychological survey, published Monday in the American Psychological Association’s Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, exploring stereotypes about perceptions of male bodies. Continue reading.
It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem. For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Continue reading
Being a pedestrian in the United States is much more dangerous for black, Native American and Hispanic people than for whites. Blacks make up 12.2 percent of the population but accounted for 19.3 percent of all pedestrian deaths in the decade ending in 2014, according to a Smart Growth America study. Continue reading.
New Mexico’s jails and prisons would face new limits on the use of solitary confinement for inmates under a bill approved 38-22 by the state House late Saturday.  The proposal now heads to the Senate, as the legislative session moves into its final week. Continue reading.
Tennessee became the first state in the nation on Monday to sue the federal government over refugee resettlement on the grounds of the 10th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Continue reading.
Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens announced Monday that state workers for executive branch agencies will now be able to receive paid leave when they have a child.  Under the policy, executive branch employees will be eligible for six weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child if they are the primary caregivers or three weeks of paid leave if they are the secondary caregivers.  Continue reading.
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